Tag Archive: Sage Business Index


“It is a daunting challenge for SME businesses to keep pace with regular legislative updates. However, automated payroll software ensures that the essential updates are automatically implemented and that payslip calculations are correct, meeting the latest legislative requirements,” adds Kok.

To help overcome this challenge, Kok says Sage Pastel Payroll & HR interprets legislative changes for start-up and small businesses and ensures that they remain compliant via payroll and HR software. RSS feeds provide information on and notification of legislative and tax changes as well delivering new system functionality releases that ensure companies always process their payrolls on the latest software version.

SMEs generally agree that excessive Government bureaucracy and Government handling of the country’s current economic challenges still top the list of the least favourable aspects of doing business.

The SBI established that globally business confidence is improving but in South Africa managing cash flow is the biggest challenge for growing businesses with government not helping as there remain 4.7-million unemployed, a lack of basic skills and protection of employed people while SME businesses battle with wage and payroll legislation.

Recognising the pressures on SME business in the current difficult economy, payroll and HR software specialist Sage Pastel Payroll & HR has introduced a payroll and HR software solution that businesses can obtain on an affordable subscription monthly payment plan.

SME business contributes significantly to the economic growth in South Africa so there is a need to harness entrepreneurial businesses and ensure that they succeed.

According to the SBI survey, South Africa is generally downbeat about local economic prospects with a low score of 44.10%, which is on a par with the UK and US at 40.65% and 41.53% respectively.

Mobility provides start-up businesses with agility and seeing as the owners are invariably busy managing many aspects of their business, Kok says Sage Pastel My Payroll Online is a lucrative online payroll solution for start-up companies. Online payroll solutions can be obtained on a ‘pay-as-you-go’ basis whereby businesses only pay when they use the system.

“It is important to provide South African companies with more than just a box of software,” says Sumay Dippenaar, marketing manager at Sage Pastel Payroll & HR. Telephone and email support services can assist users with payroll, legislation and process enquiries. “Businesses should opt for a payroll provider that offers a national footprint of certified payroll software installers to ensure they benefit from professional installation of their payroll and HR software solutions.”

For the latest legislative news, connect with Sage Pastel Payroll & HR on Twitter (Payroll News), Facebook or LinkedIn.

Sage Business Index by Softline shows local confidence in business prospects remain stable, but confidence in SA economic prospects dips

8th November 2012, Johannesburg: Softline, part of the Sage Group PLC, today released the results of The Sage Business Index – Local and International Business Insights.

The Index is a global measure of confidence across small and medium sized businesses. Nearly 11,000 small and medium sized companies in 15 countries across Europe, North America, Brazil, South Africa and Asia responded to the survey. The Index shows that whilst there is a general decline in confidence in global and local economies, businesses remain cautiously optimistic in their own growth prospects.

In South Africa, confidence in both individual business prospects and the outlook for the global economy remain largely unchanged, down slightly from March 2012 (Index scores: 64.44 to 64.19 and 44.71 to 44.54 respectively). Confidence in South Africa’s own economic prospects has fallen slightly further from 46.11 in March 2012 to 43.03 in September 2012.

South African Index Scores* September 2012 March 2012 September 2011
Global economic confidence 44.54 44.71 45.92
SA’s Country economic confidence 43.03 46.11 44.10
Own business confidence SA 64.19 64.44 62.58

(Below 50 is decline/less confident above 50 is improvement/more confident, 50 is no different)*

The research, which included 1 879 South African small to medium size businesses, was carried out by Populus, a UK based opinion and research consultancy firm.

Economic confidence – local concerns in line with macro-economic trends

All countries, with the exception of Brazil, registered an index score below 50 showing that respondents generally feel that the global economy is continuing to decline. Unsurprisingly, the Eurozone countries feel the most negative, with fears of a “double dip” recession having risen sharply.

In South Africa, businesses surveyed are feeling less confident about the prospects for the local economy, with the index declining from 46.11 to 43.03 over the past 6 months. This, however, is in sharp contrast with how they feel about their own business prospects which scored positively at 64.19.

Commenting at the official results presentation in Johannesburg today, Ivan Epstein, CEO (and co-founder) of Softline and Sage AAMEA (Asia, Australia, Middle East and Africa) said, “Looking at the results against an international backdrop, South Africa scored the second highest index rating of all the countries polled in terms of individual business confidence. Entrepreneurial spirit and business culture is identified by businesses as one of the most important aspects for doing business successfully in South Africa. This endorses my strong belief that South Africa is a fertile environment for successful entrepreneurs and small businesses.”

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Business performance and challenges – revenues maintained, cost challenges

There are some positive signs in the global survey with 63 percent of respondents saying that over the past 6 months revenue has either increased or held steady whilst 82 percent have either increased or maintained employee numbers.

South Africa achieved a similar score with 65 percent of businesses polled showing either steady or increasing revenue and 84 percent of businesses either increasing or maintaining employee numbers.

Rob Wilkie, CFO of Softline and Sage AAMEA commented that “72 percent of South African businesses said that they have adapted to the challenges of the current economic climate. The agility and resilience of businesses in South Africa is testament to a strong entrepreneurial business culture and strength of South Africa as a place to do business”.

Increasing costs are the number one concern of businesses surveyed in South Africa. Wilkie commented that “this was expected given that CPI is on an upward trend with the main drivers being food prices, fuel and electricity. In addition, an inevitable consequence of the recent high wage increases seen in the mining and transport sectors is going to be higher inflation, particularly when decoupled from increased productivity”.

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Government – businesses call on government to do more

All countries participating in the global survey feel that their governments don’t provide sufficient support for business, with the exception of Singapore where 54% of respondents indicated that their Government provides adequate support.

In South Africa businesses are calling for skills development and education (46%), the reduction of bureaucracy and legislation (40%), a reduction in business tax (34%) and currency stability (28%).  Wilkie commented, “in order to enhance its competitiveness, government must address the quality of primary education, particularly in view of a very high unemployment rate. Over-regulation and red tape is a further obstacle, specifically firing and hiring practices, wage determination, public sector tender procedures and enforcement of contracts”.

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Investment for growth – future prospects

In considering the year ahead, 29 percent of South African businesses surveyed said they were looking to diversify into new markets, 28 percent would invest further in marketing and sales within their existing markets and 27 percent would invest in skills development and training.

According to Epstein, “economic and political reforms in Africa have resulted in an improved business environment and offer an attractive opportunity for South African businesses to diversify and expand across their border.”

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In conclusion Epstein said, “ We’ve seen evidence in this research report and others, that small and medium sized business in South Africa require more focused attention from our leaders. The future of the South African economy, and most importantly, the ability to create employment in this country will be dependent the stimulation of more businesses that are sustainable over the long term. Private business and Government have a pivotal role to play in the economic growth and development of small business in South Africa.”

To view the full article, please visit http://businessindex.sage.com/

For more, please follow Softline on Twitter http://twitter.com/SageGroupZA

In September 2011, Softline launched the Sage Business Index in South Africa. Softline joined the Sage Group plc eight years ago and while the group had run the Index a year prior, South Africa did not participate. The Sage Business Index surveys small businesses across Europe, North America, South Africa and Asia, aims to reveal a definitive landscape for small businesses confidence, concerns and challenges on a bi-annual basis.

With the 2012 annual Sage Business Index fast approaching, we took a quick step back to review the results of the half year research conducted in March this year. Polling over 10 000 businesses across four continents, the Index showed that while confidence in the global economic outlook continued to decline, the outlook for local market conditions and businesses was improving. Interestingly, South Africans were slightly more pessimistic than their global counterparts about the outlook for the global economy, with a 1.21 decrease in the Index score, compared to the .52 decrease of the global sample at the time.

In March, CEO of Softline and Sage AAMEA (Africa, Asia, Middle East and Australia), Ivan Epstein said that it was encouraging to see that once again, businesses in South Africa were more confident about their own prospects. He went on to say that companies are focussed on the day-to-day challenge of maintaining and improving their businesses, and Government should do all they can to harness and help the entrepreneurial spirit that already exists.

Epstein said that he was interested in researching the impact of increasing fuel prices on local sentiment. With this week’s additional price hike, it’s clear that business and consumers alike are facing challenges.

The Index scores in March 2012 and September 2011 were as follows:

March ’12 September 11
Index Scores Global SA Global SA
Global economic confidence 43.95 44.71 44.47 45.92
Country Economic Confidence 47.26 46.11 47.11 44.10
Business Outlook 58.86 64.44 57.88 62.58

(Below 50 is decline/less confident above 50 is improvement/more confident, 50 is no different)*

The results in March 2012 also outlined that while local confidence was increasing and the rate of decline in global confidence slowing, there were still a number of challenges facing businesses. Rising inflation and the increasing cost of fuel, energy and raw materials topped the list with all countries citing this as their top concern – with 58% of local businesses listing this as their number one concern. Over a third of South African businesses noted instability or uncertainty in the local economic market as a worry, and a similar proportion (34%) said the same of reduced cash flow in the supply chain.

In anticipation of the upcoming Index, Epstein says that the Index has proven itself as a vital tool for Softline and Sage in the region to take stock of the challenges and worries affecting customers. “I hope that the upcoming results show us that the sentiment amongst businesses remain stable given the current economic climate.”

- A commentary by Rob Wilkie, CFO Softline and Sage AAMEA

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Sage Business Index polls over 10,000 businesses (across Europe, North America, South Africa and Asia) in order to measure the changing mood of business. In South Africa 1,000 businesses were surveyed and the responses show that both business outlook and economic confidence is still improving, albeit at a slower rate since last measured in September 2011.

This is consistent with the views we got from a few leading SA economists. According to them, our real income is growing. This means that we have dutifully been paying down our household debt (made easier with low interest rates). Our household debt to disposable income ratio has therefore fallen. In theory this means that we have more cash available to absorb price rises in food, petrol, tolls and electricity. In addition, banks are once again lending and households are taking on more credit. Not only are we absorbing price increases but we are also buying more with buoyancy recently reported in both retail and the consumer goods sector.

In short, there appears to be some cyclical buoyancy. The next 6 months will hopefully give us a clearer view of its sustainability.  Keep an eye out for price inflation – if it starts to rise faster than disposable income, consumer spending will decline. This is referred to as demand destroying inflation and what always follows is a drop in confidence.

…. and spare a thought for those who have not been in line for pay increases, or retirees reliant on an eroding interest income? Their real income has declined and price increases are already hurting. These households are already under a lot of pressure, a precursor perhaps for what is to come.

Scroll down for graphical analysis: South African results.

Softline, part of the Sage Group PLC, today released the results of The Sage Business Index – International and Local Business Insights. Polling over 10,000 businesses across Europe, North America, South Africa and Asia, the Index shows that while confidence in the global economic outlook continues to decline, the outlook for local market conditions and businesses is improving. In South Africa, over 1000 small and medium business decision makers were surveyed by Populus, a UK based opinion and research consultancy firm.

This year, The Sage Group PLC have created an infographic to display insights from their 2012 Business Index in a visual and interactive way. For the full infographic, detailed data, graphics and country summaries, please visit The Sage Business IndexBusiness Insights microsite.

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Key Findings from the March 2012 Business Index

Responses show that while confidence in businesses’ own prospects (business outlook) has marginally improved against the last Index, there has been a slight drop in the rate of growth, with 67 percent of businesses experiencing either neutral or positive growth, a drop of two percent on the results from the Index in September 2011. South African businesses’ growth rate also decreased by two percent from the Index in September 2011 to 67 percent. This can perhaps be explained by concerns around the rising costs of fuel and raw materials which is the number one challenge to growth. However, the improvement in both local economic confidence and business outlook suggests a more optimistic mood exists within individual companies.

Economic Confidence – global pessimism, local optimism

Interestingly, South Africans are slightly more pessimistic than their global counterparts about the outlook for the global economy with a 1.21 decrease in the Index score compared to the .52 decrease of global sample.

Ivan Epstein, CEO (and co-founder) of Softline and Sage AAMEA (Africa, Australia, Middle East and Asia) said: “It is encouraging to see that once again, businesses in South Africa are more confident about their own prospects. Companies are focussed on the day-to-day challenge of maintaining and improving their businesses, and Government should do all they can to harness and help the entrepreneurial spirit that already exists. We wait in anticipation to assess the impact of the latest fuel price increase on local sentiment when we conduct the annualised Business Index later this year.”

Business Confidence – South Africa

Business Confidence – World

March ’12 September 11
Index Scores Global SA Global SA
Global economic confidence 43.95 44.71 44.47 45.92
Country Economic Confidence 47.26 46.11 47.11 44.10
Business Outlook 58.86 64.44 57.88 62.58

(Below 50 is decline/less confident above 50 is improvement/more confident, 50 is no different)*

When looking at the data from a regional level the findings also mirror the broader economic news agenda. The UK and the US, who were the most pessimistic of the countries surveyed in September 2011 (with country index scores of 40.65 and 41.53 respectively), have both improved (44.97 and 49.28 respectively) while Euro-zone countries, Germany, Spain and France have all seen drops in confidence.  Malaysia and Singapore are still confident with a score of 51.53, but this is down from 53.26 last time.  South Africa showed increased optimism with an Index score of 46.11 up 2.01 from September 2011.

Business Performance and Challenges – revenues maintained, energy cost challenges

While local confidence is increasing and the rate of decline in global confidence slowing for the global sample, there are still a number of challenges facing businesses. Rising inflation and the increasing cost of fuel, energy and raw materials topped the list with all countries citing this as their top concern and locally 58 percent of businesses listed this among their top three concerns with 25% ranking it as their number one concern. Over a third of South African businesses see instability or uncertainty in the local economic market as a worry, and a similar proportion (34 percent) say the same of reduced cash flow in the supply chain.

Adds Epstein: “The Index is a vital tool for Softline and Sage in the region to take stock of the challenges and worries affecting our customers. The next six months will be telling and despite the input cost challenges that SME’s face going forward; we hope that the results indicate the first green shoots of recovery in South Africa with overall business outlook continuing to improve. As an indicator for the rest of 2012, three quarters of our respondents said that customer service has become even more important to their operations over the past year, which will guide how we will approach our business in the next six months.”

Revenue – World

Revenue – SA

About Softline

Softline is a leading provider of business software and related services. Founded in 1988 by Ivan Epstein, Alan Osrin and Steven Cohen, Softline was established during the formative years of the business software industry. Whilst Softline’s heritage is in the SME market the group also offers expertise and solutions that meet the needs of specific industries and larger organisations. In 2003 Softline was acquired by The Sage Group plc, a FTSE 100 company. Softline has a solid track record offering customers local expertise backed by the global Sage brand. The group delivers quality software solutions to make customers’ business lives easier.

About Sage

The Sage Group plc is a leading global supplier of business management software and related products and services, principally for small to medium-sized enterprises. Formed in 1981, Sage was floated on the London Stock Exchange in 1989. Sage has 6 million customers and more than 12,300 employees worldwide. We operate in over 23 countries covering the UK, mainland Europe, North America, South Africa, Australia and India. For further information please visit www.sage.com.

About The Sage Business Index

The Sage Business Index polled 10,009 small and medium-sized businesses across 10 countries – US, Canada, Germany, Austria France, UK, Spain, South Africa, Malaysia and Singapore over a two week period in March 2012.  Businesses were asked a range of questions regarding such issues as business confidence and outlook, how they feel about the global and local economies and what challenges they currently face.

For the full report inforgraphic, detailed data, graphics and country summaries, as well as to read to see the full results of the first and second Business Indices, please visit The Sage Business Index – Business Insights.

Survey Methodology

Populus provided online interviews with 10,009 decision makers in businesses in the UK, USA, Canada, German, France, Spain, South Africa, Malaysia, Singapore, Austria.  The businesses were drawn from two sources:

  • 8,575 respondents were drawn from Sage’s local customer databases across the UK, USA, Canada, Germany, France, Spain, South Africa, Malaysia, Singapore and Austria.  Sage’s local operating companies sent an email invitation to participate to specially selected databases with a survey link provided by Populus.  In Malaysia and Singapore, customers were invited to participate via a letter which included the details of how to enter online.  All responses were collected centrally by Populus.
  • 1,434 respondents were drawn from a dedicated online panel of business people, which has 2.4 million members worldwide.  200 interviews were conducted in all markets apart from Austria, Malaysia and Singapore where research was undertaken via Sage local operating companies, as above.  A random sample of respondents whose profiles met the client criteria were invited to take part in the survey, ensuring a spread of business sizes and industries.  Respondents were then asked a screener question to ensure that they were a decision maker at their business.

*Index Methodology

As this is the third Sage Business Index, we have applied an index methodology which allows us to measure the changing mood of the businesses surveyed in relation to business and economic confidence.  The index is based on a scale of one to 100 where 0 means a significant decline, 100 means a significant improvement, and 50 means it is no different. For the business confidence question the scale translates to below 50 as less confident and over 50 is more confident, 50 is no different.

We retrospectively applied this index methodology to the countries that took place in the first business survey in February 2011 (US, Canada, UK, Germany and France) where the questions were asked as follows:

  • “Do you feel your country’s economy is recovering or declining?” and “Do you feel the global economy is recovering or declining?” Index scores have been derived from this data where answer options in this study, and their index score weighting, were: “It is recovering significantly (100)”, “It is recovering slightly (75)”, “It is no different (50)”, “It is declining slightly (25)”, “It is declining significantly (0)”
  •  “Are you more or less confident of your business prospects over the next year?” Index scores have been derived from this data where answer options in this study, and their index score weighting, were: “More confident (75)”, “No different (50)” and “Less confident (25)”

About Populus

Populus is an opinion research and consultancy firm that specialises in understanding the views of the general public, customers, businesses and key stakeholders.  Best known for its social and political research as pollsters to media organisations such as The Times, the BBC and ITV News, it conducts large, regular, research programmes for a wide variety of clients, such as large multinational companies in retailing, food manufacturing, pharmaceutical, financial services and communications sectors, to public institutions, membership organisations and NGOs.

  • Populus has significant experience in:
  • one-to-one depth interviews with senior decision-makers and stakeholders (e.g. Members of Parliament, senior business executives, investors and analysts, specialist journalists, government advisers and civil servants, members of EU institutions, and leaders of NGOs and trade associations);
  • constructing bespoke online panels for clients wishing to engage with their stakeholders, memberships, or consumers on a continuing basis;
  • employing call-centre based or access panel research both nationally and internationally for polling Business to Business groups, the general population and specific sub-samples of the public;
  • organising focus groups – including among hard-to-reach groups – to gain greater understanding of what drives opinion and motivates key audiences or to test messaging concepts and to use stimulus material.

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DOWNLOAD THE FULL PDF REPORT: Sage Business Index Report 26 September 2011
(2.3MB – please be patient whilst this PDF document loads in a new tab once you have clicked the link)

Click here to view full sized Infographic

Sage Business Index South Africa Infographic.jpeg

DOWNLOAD THE FULL PDF REPORT: Sage Business Index Report 26 September 2011
(2.3MB – please be patient whilst this PDF document loads in a new tab once you have clicked the link)

Sage global survey amongst small and mid-sized businesses reveals drop in global economic confidence but business performance holding steady

Businesses say amidst economic uncertainty, lack of government support and rising costs they remain determined to invest for future growth

26th September, 2011–Softline, part of the Sage Group PLC, today released the results of The Sage Business Index – Local and International Business Insights. Polling over 10,000 businesses across Europe, North America, South Africa and Asia, the research shows that whilst there is a general decline in confidence in global and local economies, businesses remain cautiously optimistic in their own growth prospects.

The research, which included 2,026 South African small to medium size businesses, was carried out by Populus, a UK based opinion and research consultancy firm. The global survey results revealed that business performance held steady or improved over the past six months and that despite economic challenges ahead, businesses are looking to invest for growth in the next six months. Businesses are also calling on their governments to provide more support by reducing the red tape which they say is stifling both their growth and a general economic improvement.

Economic confidence – overall decline with some positive signs at country level

Across the board, businesses said that compared to six months ago, the global economy was in decline with the average index score declining 15% to 44.47. In respect of their local economies, business confidence was higher with an index score of 47.11; however this is a sharp decline from the 57.17 previously scored.

South African businesses rated their own business prospects positively at 62.58. This is in sharp contrast with their index scores for the South African and the global economy which were much lower at 44.10 and 45.92 respectively.

Commenting at the official results presentation in Johannesburg today, Ivan Epstein, CEO (and co-founder )of Softline and Sage AAMEA (Asia, Australia, Middle East and Africa) said, “Looking at the results against an international backdrop, South Africa scored the second highest index rating of all the countries polled in terms of individual business confidence. Entrepreneurial spirit and business culture was identified by businesses as one of the most important aspects for doing business successfully in South Africa. This endorses my strong belief that South Africa is a breeding ground for successful entrepreneurs and small businesses.”

Business performance and challenges – revenues maintained, cost challenges

In terms of international business performance there was some positive news with over two thirds of businesses surveyed showing either steady or improving revenues over the past six months. Only 12 percent of businesses said they were forced to reduce their number of employees.

In South Africa, 75 percent of businesses polled showed either steady or increasing revenue. Employee numbers remained consistent with 50 percent of businesses reporting that they had not increased employee numbers over the period.

The biggest challenges identified in the survey of the past six months were the rising cost of energy, fuel and raw materials (53percent); winning new customers or accessing new markets (47 percent); maintaining or growing revenue (41 percent); and managing cash flow (37 percent). South African businesses cited similar challenges with political instability emphasised as a further concern.

Future plans – invest to grow

In terms of investment priorities looking forward, 41 percent of South African businesses intend to invest in sales and marketing 37 percent will consider diversifying into new markets and 32 percent will invest further in training and/or the launching of innovative products and services.

The role of Government – bureaucracy remains a hindrance.

Businesses are in agreement with the factors that restrict them – irrespective of country the least favourable aspect of doing business is government bureaucracy and legislation, followed by governments handling of economic challenges.

Over half (53 percent) of South African businesses polled say that government bureaucracy and legislation is one of the least favourable aspects of doing business. When probed further, 62 percent of businesses stated employee and labour law whilst 48 percent said procurement and tender procedures for public sector contracts were the most cumbersome aspects. Smaller businesses further cited a lack of sufficient support and advice.

“We want to represent an honest picture of the realities facing businesses every day and most importantly define how Softline, Sage, governments and industry can further support small and medium sized businesses in both South Africa and around the world,” concluded Epstein.