Tag Archive: HR


Philip Meyer

Philip Meyer

Connected Services enables SME companies to extend their desktop payroll with an online solution that eases the growing burden of HR managers and payroll administrators.

Connected Services includes a web-based self-service tool that enables employees to manage and maintain their own information online, thereby carrying some of the overall HR administration responsibility. They are able to make online applications for leave, loans, bursaries, travel claims, view their payslips and update personal information no matter where they are so long as they have an internet connection.

The adoption rate of online business software for new entrants into the market is increasing, posing the question of how to bridge the gap between the growing trend towards online software adoption and the traditional desktop application users in the same market segments.

The advantages and conveniences of connected services assist with expediting the many benefits of dual-deployment business software models such as client-side hosted applications with significant connected services capabilities and functionality, together with a seamless upgrade path to ultimately complete cloud-based models facilitated by vendors.

Connected Services has workflow capabilities based on the organisation chart or specific workflow orders per online form. Once an employee applies for leave online and it is management approved, the payroll & HR systems are automatically updated. The software also provides for leave scheduling, particularly practical over traditional December holidays when “skeleton staff” is required. The programme helps to manage minimum staff levels by providing system warnings.

When applying a connected services solution such as Self Service, companies should consider a hosted solution.  This guarantees quick deployment at low implementation cost, meaning companies do not have to invest in additional infrastructure to host the online application. All a company needs is an internet connection and a computer.

Frictionless (automated) payroll legislative updates
Frictionless updates are another example of connected services. This functionality enables traditional desktop applications to seamlessly update over the internet with minimal intervention from the end-user of the software.

Users no longer need to visit a website to download and install updates or CD versions manually as the connected services functionality does it all for them, directly from their payroll software. The days of CD-based updates and disruptive installation and implementation cycles are over.

RSS Feeds within payroll software
Another component of Connected Services allows HR managers and payroll administrators to receive RSS feeds to their desktops notifying them of legislative and tax changes as well as new system software releases so that the company is always on track and up to date.

The internet and, more specifically, cloud-based and online business applications constitute some of the most compelling opportunities for streamlining the way business is now conducted. It is reassuring that the optimisation of internet capabilities will almost certainly not amount to a one-size fits all model.

It is rather the incremental evolution of traditional desktop software, leveraging the internet where it is appropriate and business enhancing, that is playing an important role in the evolutionary shift to complete cloud-based business software provisioning, billing and deployment. This is providing a flexible and extensible migration path to the cloud, taking into account preferences of individual business requirements, as will pure cloud-only offerings.

Reduce payroll fraud and bank rejections with automated payroll software
Opt for a payroll vendor that can offerID number and bank account validations, as well as Employee Credit Checks and the delivery of secure salary EFT payments directly from the payroll software.

Companies need to take steps to avoid paying fake employees and can reduce payroll fraud and bank rejections, ensuring that they avoid stalling when processing salary payments. By combining monthly employee ID Number validation and verification with monthly bank account validation and verification together with secure payment services, companies  ensure that not only are they paying the correct employee through the correct bank account, but also that the payment is expedited in the most secure manner possible.

By validating and verifying the ID Numbers on the payroll, companies create complete peace of mind in the knowledge that not only has their employee provided a valid ID Number but also that the ID Number has been verified as belonging to the associated employee and is recorded on the Department of Home Affairs list of official ID Numbers. This eliminates both fake ID Numbers as well as ID Numbers not associated with the given employee.

With secure salary EFT payments, payment batches can be created automatically within a payroll system without creating the infamous “text files” which on some payroll systems needed to be stored on the hard drive of the Payroll Administrator’s computer and then forwarded or transferred to the authorised user of the banking software for transmission to the relevant bank. Avoiding editable payment  text files improves efficiency and eliminates yet another potential area for payroll fraud, ensuring a tamperproof payment is imported into the banking software.

By performing credit checks on employees, companies and Human Resource managers are provided with valuable information on existing and potential employees including judgments, defaults, notices / alerts, fraud listings / indicators, marital status spouse details and all residential address details. Reports can sourced from the three main credit bureaus in South Africa, namely TransUnion, Experian and XDS.

For more information on in-payroll software ID Number and Bank Account validation and verification services, contact Sage Pastel Payroll & HR and enquire about their Sage Pastel Connect Module.

For the latest legislative news, connect with Sage Pastel Payroll & HR. on Twitter (Payroll News), LinkedIn, Facebook.

by Anja Hartman, HR Director at Sage VIP

Anja Hartman

Anja Hartman

The impact of employees that intentionally refrain from adhering to company rules, as well as the cost, time and energy wasted to solve such issues are counter-productive. For this reason, organisations should try to avoid the appointment of a ‘toxic’ employee as far as possible.

At VIP a simple rule is used when recruiting employees: “hire the smile and teach the skill”. VIP has a very strong value-based culture and instils it from the day that the employee starts with the company.

Companies have the right and responsibility to manage its business in a profitable way. Employees must therefore be managed in such a way that it will enhance efficiency and profitability, which implies creating and implementing regulated standards of behaviour.  In order to be effective, the employee needs to know which actions are regarded as unacceptable and the reasons for it.

The difference in how you approach a ‘toxic’ and underperforming employee lies in the question:  Are they willing and/or able to do the job?  It is almost always related to either their attitude or skill.  The underperforming employee is usually willing but not able to do the job while attitude is often found at the core of ‘toxic’ behaviour.

Underperforming employees are often incapable of doing the job for which he/she has been employed due to lack of skill, knowledge or ability. Companies should place their emphasis on matching the talent of the candidate with the role requirements during the recruitment and internal movement processes. A misfit of these key indicators often results in underperformance.

Underperformance can also be referred to as circumstance of ‘no fault’ on the employee’s side and should be addressed by means of counselling procedures, such as:

  • Step 1: Assessment – Review the content and standards of the job, evaluate the performance and pinpoint shortfalls. Identify and discuss the reasons for the sub-standard performance. Assess the employee’s competence against the job standards.
  • Step 2: Action plan – the manager and employee agree on the appropriate plan of action to rectify the situation.
  • Step 3: Review – decide on a reasonable date to review and monitor the improvement and establish if the underperformance has been resolved. A secondary review date can be set.
  • Step 4: Counselling enquiry – If it becomes clear that even after further counselling, the employee still does not perform in accordance with the required standards, or does not prove that he/she is capable of achieving the required standards, a counselling enquiry is called. A counselling enquiry is the medium through which the fair and just procedures required by law are conducted. A dismissal without an enquiry is deemed to be unfair.

The above-mentioned guidelines and steps do not refer to those situations where the employee is capable to perform in accordance with the standards set, but intentionally or negligently refrains from adhering thereto.

When an employee’s conduct is not in line with the rules, regulations or values of the company, it is dealt with as misconduct in accordance with the company’s disciplinary code and policy. It is however impossible to list all possible situations in the disciplinary code and it should therefore not be seen as an exhaustive list of conduct that the company will address by way of disciplinary action in the form of a disciplinary hearing.

The guidelines for a disciplinary hearing:

  • Step 1: Investigation – investigate the facts before embarking on formal action.
  • Step 2: Notification of the hearing – sufficient written notification of the hearing should be given. Employees have the right to internal representation and if required, an interpreter.
  • Step 3: Conducting the hearing
  • Step 4: Applicable sanction – if the employee is found guilty a decision is taken after mitigating and aggravating circumstances are presented.
  • Step 5: Notification – the employee is notified of the outcome, if they are dissatisfied with the outcome they may appeal.

By Sandra Swanepoel, Director Sage VIP

Sandra Swanepoel

Sandra Swanepoel

Companies consider replacing their payroll and HR systems from time to time. The reasons may vary, ranging from questions about the technology and problems with service, through to group decisions, mergers or features that lack in current applications. The ten most reasons why Companies, that have been using Sage VIP for many years, continue with our product, are mainly the following:

  1. At Sage VIP CIDCustomer Intimacy Discipline’ means that we deliver world class customer service. This can be attributed to the fact that we invest in customer service training, which uplifts and measures our employee performance on an on-going basis. It is addictive and clients that experience it want more, which explains why 99.39% of our users recommend Sage VIP as the payroll and HR solution of choice.
  2. The biggest cost facing companies is their human resource costs that need to be managed effectively. Sage VIP’s software is designed in such a way that you can manage your ROI per employee or per department with optimum accuracy. The data is available online, in real time at the click of a button which underscores informed decision-making.
  3. How much do you need to know when you want to be a Payroll or HR consultant? At Sage VIP a graduate is given classroom product training for four months, which is followed by supervised practical sessions with the assistance of specialists. Some may consider it to be a bit of an over kill but when you work at Sage VIP you realise just how much a customer depends on your expertise, it can never be underestimated.
  4. Feature rich software sounds so yesterday, yet you cannot invest in anything less than that if you need software that is flexible. It is essentially an investment in the future of your business and if your payroll and HR system cannot cater for the requirements you never thought would happen, it will cost you dearly in the long run.
  5. Legislation is a must for all payroll and HR applications, and often I hear companies say that every payroll calculates tax; but how quickly are legislative changes made available, and does it include all the legislation? Catering for legislative changes means doing it across multifaceted environments and countries, accurately and comprehensively.
  6. Sage VIP walked away with the Deloitte best company to work for award for the third year running in 2012. It means that our employees are challenged and content, which directly translates into longstanding client relationships that are built on integrity.
  7. The infrastructure that Sage VIP offer provides support to companies in remote parts of the country with fully functional offices in Pretoria, Johannesburg, Durban, Cape Town, Port Elizabeth, East London, Bloemfontein, Gaborone, Windhoek and Nairobi. It is a key consideration that companies, who are planning to expand their operations across South Africa and Africa, should heed.
  8. Sage VIP’s operational systems such as its national call centre and CRM products are state of the art.  Some may question the value of these systems but it saves time and underpins flawless customer service that will help you solve your query quickly and efficiently.
  9. Innovation is a core value at Sage VIP that defines software that is fresh and up-to-date. We invest in technology solutions so that our clients never need to reinvest in new software.  One of our customers has been with Sage VIP for 23 years, which is unheard of in the industry, yet part of the package at Sage VIP.
  10. Sage VIP has ample resources available that companies can utilise. If you are looking for a payroll and HR administrator that is well acquainted with Sage VIP’s products you can rest assured that there are many expert people available and looking for opportunities.

By Anja Hartman, HR Director for Softline VIP, part of the Sage Group Plc.

Anja Hartman-Weitz

Anja Hartman-Weitz

People are at the top of the agenda in many a company with the war for talent intensifying in many business sectors.  It is therefore crucial for the Human Resources (HR) department to recognise the value that it brings in terms of helping the business to compete in finding the right talent.

The future of HR however depends on its business presence.  You need to have the mindset of a business role-player first and then an HR professional to understand the contribution that HR can make to the bigger picture.  It boils down to how well you really know your business and who your clients are, may it be employees, line managers, Exco members, external clients or even investors.  Ask yourself the following questions, to establish whether you understand your business:

  • What are the top three priorities and concerns of your business leaders?
  • Who is your biggest client and why do they use your service or product?
  • Which product/service is the most profitable, and why?
  • What emerging technology trends can influence your business?
  • What socio-economic or political trends might be disruptive to your industry?
  • What is the company’s operating margin?
  • What was the revenue and profit for the previous financial year?

If you are familiar with the needs of the business, your HR practices will reflect that knowledge. The answers to the above questions can help the HR practitioner to achieve business objectives through informed HR desicions.

There are many ways in which HR practices can support business performance.  The principles and philosophies that you implement as an HR professional affect the workplace, the value chain, the company’s value proposition as well as the technology that the company uses.  The people represent the company’s image and its ability to adequately deliver its service or product and it is ultimately your responsibility to shape that image and to align it with the business needs.

The broader HR mandate far exceeds the mere administration of HR technology and policies alone.  The focus has shifted towards the management of talent which includes recruitment, training and development, performance management, talent assessment and succession planning.  As far as the organisation is concerned, HR practices will shape the business structure, rewards, internal communication and process design.

It is crucial that the organisation’s HR strategy underscores that of the business.  HR goals need to be consistent with that of the company’s and need to be designed to make the business strategy happen.  Likewise, HR also needs buy-in from management to mobilise its strategy.

It is therefore necessary to focus on building relationships of trust.  To make an impact in the business the HR professional needs to be confident, have a commercial point of view, be able to speak candidly and influence others. A positive investment in their own personal growth will help any HR professional in this regard.

The key elements to focus on are to create a business presence, to learn the language of your business and to continue with an HR mindset. The ultimate goal is to empower your people and to focus on business results as these are lifelines that keep your business alive.

Of all the elements that need to be considered if a company is to be able to select the best candidate for a specific position, the most difficult to gauge or judge correctly is the culture fit.

“It’s also one of the most important elements in any evaluation of potential employees,” says Grant Lloyd, managing director Softline Pastel Payroll.

Companies need to have a feel for and have an understanding of the company culture. Lloyd says culture is usually driven from the top down and is established by the upper echelons of management. However, it is never cast in stone and can change with the appointment of a new CEO or management team.

“There are many influences on company culture, including the alignment of the company vision, the business objectives and the business ethics,” says Lloyd. “Whoever is conducting the recruitment needs to have a feel for the company vision, objective and ethics because they not only shape the company culture but also the various job descriptions and purposes aligned to them within a specific department.”

Key performance areas (KPAs) and key performance indicators (KPIs) are also important in assessing the culture fit and ensuring the candidate will be able to deliver what the business needs.

“This is complicated by the fact that not all companies have integrated the business culture and the company values with their KPAs. While these historically were used to measure individual performance, the process is now open to much wider interpretation,” adds Lloyd.

“Employers need to clearly understand the purpose behind each individual recruitment and employment process. The information for this understanding must come from the person that the new recruit will be working for.”

People involved in the hiring process often sway towards taking on someone with a similar personality to their own, which is not necessarily the best fit and hence it is important to also involve line managers and team leaders to provide another perspective.

He adds that people often perceive themselves incorrectly and that the characteristics most sought after in recruitment are trust, respect, honesty, accountability, integrity and consistency.

Honesty throughout the recruitment process is paramount because it saves time and money for both parties. The company should state exactly what it is looking for and the applicants need to present themselves honestly. A complication is the fact that divisions within companies tend to develop sub-cultures and the candidate fit has to match.

“Personality traits also need to be examined, and this is a whole science in itself. But it is an important area and it is very useful to know a candidate’s personality as it is invariably a strong indicator of suitability and culture fit,” says Lloyd.