Archive for August, 2013


The Essential CIO

Welcome to the biennial IBM Global Chief Information Officer Study, reflecting face-to-face conversations with over 3,000 CIOs from organizations of every size, sector and region. Through these conversations, we have gained a stronger sense of the primary issues impacting CIOs in the two years since our inaugural study. One of the most compelling findings in the study is that CIOs are now increasingly in step with CEOs’ top priorities. One priority they agree on is how critical it is for today’s public and private sector organizations to derive insight from the huge volumes of data being amassed across the enterprise, and turn those insights into competitive advantage with tangible business benefits. CLICK HERE to read more

Most BI thought leadership articles these days include a fairly significant section on mobile data consumption, and how trends are heading in this direction. The predictions from analysts suggest that by 2013, as much as 33% of business intelligence functionality will be consumed via handheld devices.This inherently sets out to challenge the thinking of traditional BI vendors in terms of how their solutions become relevant in the mobile space. It can be tempting to re-invent the wheel in an effort to lead the charge with something really cool, something that demo’s well, without carefully thinking about what device the majority of customers are likely to use, and how they will consume or interact with the data on this device, and of course, what makes practical sense to add value to their day to day operations and decision making. To read more, CLICK HERE

 

Small and medium businesses (SMBs, defined as companies with 1-1000 employees) comprise 99% of employer firms in the United States and account more than 50% of total IT spending (Source: SMB Group estimates and U.S. Census Bureau Data). The SMB Group’s 2012 Small and Medium Business Routes to Market Study will help technology and telecom product, software and services vendors and service providers deepen their understanding of how businesses in this extraordinarily market discover and gain awareness of technology solutions; the sources that influence them to consider, evaluate and purchase them; the purchasing process; and channels that they buy technology solutions from. The study will also provide trending insights based on year-over-year data comparisons with the SMB Group’s 2011 Small and Medium Business Routes to Market Study Study results and analysis will help vendors make well-informed marketing, product development, media and channel decisions to successfully reach, influence and market to North American SMBs with one to 1,000 employees… Read more : Click Here

Microsoft Excel is the universal language of business and accountants and most decision-makers in small to mid-sized businesses use ‘the king of spreadsheets’ in some way for reporting. In fact, research analyst Gartner has conceded that “Excel is still the number one reporting tool”[1]. Why then, would you want or need to use Sage Intelligence, a Business Intelligence (BI) tool, and not just Excel for your business reporting?

Let’s begin by answering this question with some more questions: Can you say with conviction that you have a clear view of your company’s performance? Do you have visibility of MTD and YTD sales year on year? Can you see, whenever you want to, how your profitability or cash flow is tracking? How about top 5 customers, expenses, or salespeople

To read more: Click here

Annelie VisserAnnelie is the National Sales Manager for Sage VIP. She is responsible for growing the organisation’s market share in all segments, from small start-up businesses to large and corporate enterprises.  “Being part of a team that is innovative and successful is rewarding and the launch of new products makes my day to day work-life fulfilling and stimulating,” says Annelie.

 

Annelie believes the challenges she faces every day are not any different to those of her male counterparts.  “Things have definitely changed over the years and when you do good work it is about your output and not your gender.”

Her secret to a healthy work-life balance: If you love your job, it is possible to balance your responsibilities at work with your family duties.  It is all about priorities and staying focused. I always ensure that I spend quality time with my daughter when I get home and when she goes to bed, I will attend to work matters, if necessary. It also helps to have a good support structure, seeing that I am a single mother.

“To be employed gives women economic freedom that allows them to take charge of their own life and destiny, as well as making a difference in their workplace,” says Annelie.

Annelie’s advice to other women in a corporate environment:

If there is a conflict of opinion with a person or department within the organisation, try not to get over emotional and rather step out of the content, refocus on the issue at hand and always strive for common goals and purpose.

Jenny Venter

Jenny is an Organisational Development Specialist at Sage VIP, who helps clients  overcome any human capital challenges.In 2010, her  passion for starting new things gave her an opportunity to start the Organisational Development Consulting unit.

Jenny’s secret to a healthy work-life balance: I spend 30 minutes every morning reviewing my principles in life and answering for myself the following three questions: “It is important for me to not only spend quality time with my clients, but also with family and friends and to take some time for myself to recharge and reflect on my daily experiences.”

 - What values am I willing to be punished for?

- What results am I trying to achieve?

- Which activities today will have an 80% or greater impact on results?

Jenny’s advice to other women in a corporate environment:

·    Come to work with an attitude of curiosity and willingness to be challenged

·    Be fearless without losing your feminine touch. Who you are, determines the quality and effectiveness of your leadership.

I believe Peter Block said it best: “The delivery vehicle of my expertise is my humanity.” 

Sandra SwanepoelSandra is the Sales Director at Sage VIP and she is strategically involved in the management of the business as a whole.  She is responsible for business development of new markets by growing Sage VIP’s market share across all market segments.  “My career is jam-packed with many highlights, such as the launch of several innovative products and the growth of Sage VIP from a small family business to a business with 730 employees and a customer base of more than 26 000 customers.”

According to her, women in a corporate environment will always be faced with equality challenges. “However, we should recognise our differences and use it to rather build on the many talents and strengths woman indeed can offer in the workplace. This mind-set has helped me to never really experience the differences as challenges, but rather as opportunities to do things differently.”

Sandra’s secret to a healthy work-life balance: I believe in exercising daily and to also participate in various running and cycling events – small or big. This is something I treasure and it has had an amazing positive impact on my life because it ensured wonderful friends and relationships, something which has kept me well-balanced in my career.

Sandra’s advice to other women in a corporate environment:

·         Be confident and approachable

·         Never stop the learning process, be inquisitive about everything. Ensure you are up to date with business and technology issues by reading regularly

·         Surround yourself with strong, optimistic and positive individuals.

·         Always be true to yourself, no matter what

·         Work hard, always give your best and work as if the business is your own. You will then feel a sense of achievement

·         Be passionate about the company you work for. My passion has really given me an amazing career

Anja Hartman

Anja is the HR Director of Sage VIP and she is responsible for the Human Capital within the company with a specific focus on maintaining Sage VIP’s status as an employer of choice. “I love the feeling when I can help people reach their potential and in my role as head of HR, I have the privilege to see it happen regularly.”

“As women, we tend to take things personally at work, while we should rather aim at having a positive attitude and mind-set. I also rely on the principle of straight talk. One should rather deal with a tough conversation than try to avoid it. I have learnt in life to talk tentatively, makes a huge difference in ensuring that a message is positively received.”

Anja’s secret to a healthy work-life balance: Plan ahead, be prepared and organised. Allowing myself some me-time leisure also ensures I have enough stamina to face all my responsibilities at work. I believe that – ‘life is short, live it’ – one should aim to have balance in all areas of life – body, mind and spirit.

Anja’s advice to other women in a corporate environment:

·         Choose your attitude – It is irrelevant what you face, it is all about how you decide to think and react to the situation

·         Excellence is not a habit; it is a way of life – Do whatever you do to the best of your ability; be it doing homework with the kids or sitting in a meeting at work

·         Define your dreams and take responsibility for making it happen – I also believe in continuous learning, so ensure that you read and grow as a person

Karen Schmikl

Karen Schmikl

Karen is the Business Manager for Sage VIP’s online business. She is responsible for not only designing the software but also needs to manage its marketing, sales and support functions. “I have been part of the Sage VIP team for 12 years and during this time I have had the privilege to work in various departments, giving me exposure to different aspects of the business. My job is fulfilling, with various aspects keeping it interesting and challenging,” says Karen.

“Working in a corporate environment is challenging but you need to take responsibility for ensuring that you have knowledge, expertise and experience in your field of business. This makes it easier to show you can make a difference as a woman and it will also instil a culture of respect amongst fellow colleagues. However you will need patience and perseverance,” says Karen.

According to Karen, the corporate environment is very much driven by a male energy and usually emotions do not have a place in the work environment. “It remains a challenge to stay in touch with your female energy, while managing yourself in your work space. It is not all about being emotional, but rather about tapping into your intuition and making that work.”

Her secret to a healthy work-life balance: It should be as important for you to ‘achieve’ at home, as it is at work. I always ask myself what my kids and husband would say about me if they had to give me an annual performance review. Ensure you have a healthy outlet to stress. You are one person doing different things. The balance is found within yourself – everything that is important to you needs attention. Work is very much part of one’s life, you cannot see it as something separate, so it should form a healthy part of your life.

Karen believes in doing a job that you love and can do well. “Money is important, we need it to survive, but what we do for our money is our choice, so make it a good choice.”

Karen’s advice to other women in a corporate environment:

·         Always remember what your values are and use that as a basis for how you work

·         Look for recognition within yourself – decide what is important for you, what you want to achieve and how you are going to measure it. It can make you miserable waiting for external recognition

·         Be fair, be honest and be true to yourself

·         Always respect other people, and yourself

The bi-annual company tax return season opens on 1 September 2013 and it makes sense for companies to prepare their mandatory information in August to avoid SARS e@syFile rejections and late submission penalties.

All South African companies are required to reconcile and submit PAYE, UIF, SDL contributions for the period of 01 September 2013 – 31 October 2013.

“Companies have about four weeks to prepare their submission information and update their payroll systems before performing their last payroll run in August,” says Philip Meyer, technology director at Sage Pastel Payroll & HR.

“It is critical for companies to ensure that they download and install the latest version of SARS e@syFile before reconciling.  Companies are advised to backup their current information on their computers prior to installing a new version of e@syFile Employer, as the installation may delete the current information.

Another important requirement for companies is to comply with new legislation pertaining to employees making use of company vehicles leased by their employer. Meyer says the fringe benefit value is the rental contract plus the fuel cost for the month. However, the rental contract must be classified as an operating lease.

Income tax reference numbers are another important element in returns. Companies can only submit tax certificates to SARS if each employee has an income tax reference number. Submissions in which one or more tax certificates do not have the mandatory individual income tax reference number specified will not be accepted by SARS.

Companies using an automated payroll software solution can obtain employee tax reference numbers via the bulk ITREG functionality and the e@syFile Employer system to simplify the reconciliation.

Attention should also be paid to new source codes in the event that the employer pays a lump sum to the family of a deceased employee. The first R300 000 of the lump sum is tax free but the portion exceeding R300 000 is taxed  by way of a SARS directive and the lump sum must be reported against code 3922 and the PAYE on the lump sum must be allocated to code 4115.

For the latest legislative news, connect with Sage Pastel Payroll & HR on Twitter (Payroll News), Facebook or LinkedIn.